4 Vital Morning Meeting Components You'll Want to Include - Elementary Education

4 Vital Morning Meeting Components You’ll Want to Include

Morning meetings aren’t new. We hear about them all the time but what do they *actually* involve? Maybe you’re a brand new teacher trying to navigate all of the must-dos, or maybe you’re a veteran looking to hone your skills. No matter what, today we are breaking down morning meeting components in the classroom.

a bulletin board that says morning meeting components to do daily

Here’s the thing: I love morning meeting because it’s straightforward, it’s broken into parts, and it’s the best gosh darn community-builder out there. Such a great way to start my day. Truth: I *even* tried having family morning meetings during the pandemic lockdown period. (Spoiler alert: It didn’t go as well.) Morning meetings are best executed in classrooms. So: what exactly does that look like? Let’s dive into the morning meeting components.

Component #1: Greeting

One of my favorite morning meeting components is the greeting. The morning meeting greeting is a great way for students to get face-to-face time with each other and practice social skills. Greetings are probably my favorite because they are so versatile. You can do greetings with partners, small groups, the whole class, or in a mingle-around-the-classroom timed style.

Some of my favorite morning meeting greetings include:

Pirate Greeting

A slide on a whiteboard that gives directions for "Arrrrgh" morning meeting greeting.
This one is universally fun, and there are more options beyond the voice (think movement!) to personify a pirate in this greeting.

Giving students a chance to be silly can really break the ice for students and give them a warm, comfortable start to the day. This one is also really funny to watch as a teacher 😉

What’s the News?

A morning meeting slide called "What's the News" depicting a dog relaxing
“What’s the News?” is awesome for students who just *have* to share when they come back from school after the weekend or break.

This one is great because it nips the “back from the weekend” hype. You know what I’m talking about: when kids are so excited to see each other and the novelty of being reunited usurps the way they should be using their listening ears. This greeting lets them get it all out so the focus can return to learning.

Snowball Fight

A morning meeting slide depicting crumpled balls of paper titled "Snowball Fight"
Messy but fun, it pays off to prep ahead with this one!

This one is a tad high-maintenance but when used sparingly, the kids love it. Keep a stack of papers on hand and have each student write their name on a piece. (You could even pre-print a stack of papers with each student’s name on it, come to think of it).

If you teach upper elementary, here are a few ideas for your older kids:

Business meeting

A slide on a whiteboard that gives directions for "Business Meeting" morning meeting greeting.

Give me 3

A slide on a whiteboard that gives directions for "Give Me 3" morning meeting greeting.

Good News/Bad News

A slide on a whiteboard that gives directions for "Good News, Bad News" morning meeting greeting.

💡Pro tip: At the beginning of the year, introduce one or several greetings each day and have students model each greeting in a fishbowl style (in this case, one small group or pair models while the whole class observes).

Component #2: Share Questions

Share questions are also a great way to give students a chance to, well, share their thoughts, feelings, and opinions. It gives all students a voice and lets them know their voice matters. In addition, responses can tell you a lot about a student’s personal life. When it comes to morning meeting components, there’s more to share questions than meets the eye!

Here are some examples from my lower elementary morning meeting slides:

A slide on a whiteboard that asks, "If you were a tree, where would you want to be planted and why?"
Share question slide from the K-2 morning meeting collection
A slide on a whiteboard that asks, "If you could invite a famous person to your birthday party, who would you invite and why?"
Share question slide from the K-2 morning meeting collection
A slide on a whiteboard that asks, "Tell us your weekend plans using the 5 w's."
Share question slide from the K-2 morning meeting collection

Examples from the upper elementary slides contain similar questions but are geared toward 3rd-5th graders:

A slide on a whiteboard that asks, "What is the grossest food you've ever eaten?"
Share question slide from the upper elementary morning meeting collection
A slide on a whiteboard that asks, "What is something that freaks you out? Why?"
Share question slide from the upper elementary morning meeting collection

💡Pro tip: Make sure to agree on a “connection” or “me too” signal students can use silently when they agree or have something in common with another student sharing.

Morning Meeting Component #3: Activity

The activity portion of the morning meeting is meant to encourage community-building. Students typically engage in an activity for 5-10 minutes that is done in pairs, groups, or as a whole class.

Here are some examples from my lower elementary morning meeting slides:

A slide on a whiteboard with directions for the morning meeting activity called "The Voice"
Activity slide from the upper elementary morning meeting collection
A slide on a whiteboard with directions for the morning meeting activity called "Mystery Number"
Activity slide from the upper elementary morning meeting collection

Here are some examples from my upper elementary morning meeting slides:

A slide on a whiteboard with directions for the morning meeting activity called "Halfback Hustle"
Morning meeting activity from upper elementary slides
A slide on a whiteboard with directions for the morning meeting activity called "Advice Column"
Morning meeting activity from upper elementary slides

💡Pro tip: Set a timer before you start the activity. This is often the most fun morning meeting component for kids, and it’s tempting to get carried away in a game or activity! (I’m also guilty of this!)

Component #4: Message

According to the proper morning meeting order, the morning message comes last. I’m not saying I disagree with this, it just personally feels unnatural to have the message at the end. In any case, the order is ultimately up to you.

The morning message is versatile:

  • Some teachers prefer to keep it simple and read it as a class to build fluency.
  • Some teachers use it to review other academic skills (ex: Math Monday)*
  • Other times, it’s used to give an overview of the day.
  • Messages can be hand-written or electronic, but make sure to use fonts that students can read.

Academic messages come in handy during the testing season for test prep. Nothing like erasing that last-minute “did I teach them enough?!” guilt like a hidden review lesson inside your morning message 😉

Here are 5 different examples (I’m a theme gal, as you’ll see):

A slide on a whiteboard with a morning message example
Math Monday can involve a real-life story problem!
A slide on a whiteboard with a morning message example
True Life Tuesday is a fun time to teach your students an interesting fact!
A slide on a whiteboard with a morning message example
Squeeze in a weekly vocabulary word to cultivate a classroom of wordsmiths!
A slide on a whiteboard with a morning message example
The discussion these questions generate is what life-long lessons are made of
A slide on a whiteboard with a morning message example
A quick Google search for jokes that are kid-friendly makes this one an easy one to prepare for!

💡Pro tip: Write all your messages at the beginning of each week. Some things are harder than others to accomplish at the last minute, and morning messages are no exception.

In conclusion, you need a morning meeting in your life. But…4 parts? Every day? I know. Holy planning time. No fear, my friend: that’s why we like morning meeting slides. I loved them so much in my own classroom that I sell them on TpT now. You can see those here if you want, OR you can skip straight to your prize and download a free week of morning meeting slides to try in your classroom today:

Free Week of Lower Elementary Morning Meeting

Free Week of Upper Elementary Morning Meeting

This site contains affiliate links. This simply means if you buy something using our link, we will receive a very small portion of the sales. The price of the item is the same whether it is an affiliate link or not. It is our promise to you that we only recommend products or services we believe will add value to our readers. By using the affiliate links, you are helping support our Website, and we genuinely appreciate your support.
Tell your friends!
Follow:
0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *